Hotel Bray/ New Yorker ghost sign

A slender downtown architectural beauty, the historic former Hotel Bray at 1114 Baltimore Ave., is a nine-story building, 25-feet wide and 125 feet deep, and is wedged between the Hotel Phillips and the Italian Garden garage on Baltimore.

The Jacobethan-style brick building, which is capped by a decorative terra cotta double gable, opened in 1915 as the Hotel Bray. In 1947, after extensive remodeling, it was rechristened as Pusateri’s Hotel New Yorker. It was renovated again in the mid 1990s as an extended stay hotel before eventually being converted to modern loft apartments and reopening as The New Yorker in 2018.

Below is a 360° “tour” (two separate 360° pictures) of the Hotel Bray/ New Yorker ghost signs and area… clicking on the arrows allows you to move left and right. Use your mouse to look up, look down, look all around… and zoom in or out. The vertical Hotel Bray signs on the Northeast and Southeast corners of the building date some time from 1915 to 1949… the painted sign on the Northwest side of the building dates from 1949

I was able to determine what the ghost sign originally looked like via the transcripts of a 1949 court case of the New Yorker Hotel Corporation v. Pusateri et al. The lawsuit claimed damages from Pusateri for using the name Hotel New Yorker. An excerpt from the filing reads… “The building immediately to the north of the defendants’ nine story hotel building is a one story structure, thus leaving most of the side of defendants’ building exposed to view, and along the side thereof, near the top, defendants, at the time of the opening, had caused to be painted in large letters, the words “Hotel New Yorker.” …. at the time the change…. thus making this sign also read: “H O T E L NEW YORKER Restaurant & Cocktail Lounge Completely Air Conditioned”

The image below on the left shows what the building looks like today… on the right what Pusateri’s Hotel New Yorker might have looked like in 1949

The case ended in a judgement against the plaintiff (New Yorker Hotel Corp), but not without some interesting testimony that gives great insight to KC history…. “In its effort to show that defendants may operate their hotel in such manner as to reflect upon its good name, plaintiff attacks the reputation of defendants. Defendant James Pusateri admitted that they illegally sold intoxicating liquor in their restaurants during prohibition. Plaintiff also sought to show that defendant Gus Pusateri, who did not testify, has been convicted of violating the liquor law. The offer was denied on the ground that the conviction was more than sixteen years ago during the “dry era.”

Here is a link to a Google Tour of the ghost signs with “Points of Interest” that link to more information about the art, architecture and history of the surrounding area. Click on the photo to take the tour… or just click the link below!

Click on picture or this link to take tour – https://poly.google.com/view/7Is-8YdX0st

Walking Tour Map of KC Art

Recent Posts

Taps on Main street art

Located just South of the Power and Light District, and on the Northern edge of the Crossroads Arts District, this mural of cyborg beer drinkers is on the North side of the Taps on Main craft beer pub at 1715 Main Street. Notice several other examples of street art/ advertising in this picture – The Tom’s Town – The People are Thirsty sign directly behind you (North), and the Sporting KC mural just to the West. The Kauffman Center for Performing Arts and the Bartle Hall Sky Stations sculptures can be seen to the West.

Below is a 360° “tour” of this mural… clicking on the arrows allows you to move left and right.

And here is a link to a Google Tour of the Mural with “Points of Interest” that link to more information about the art and surrounding area. Click on the photo to take the tour… or just click the link below!

Click on Image or this link to take the tour  ...  https://poly.google.com/view/avAo5e5QZux
Click on Image or this link to take the tour … https://poly.google.com/view/dC6bwWQqpxD

Power and Light District mural

The nine block Power and Light District in Kansas City was opened in 2008 and has given a significant impetus to the revitalization of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. In 2007, Alexander Austin received a commission to paint a mural covering 18,000 square feet, transforming a two block stretch of blank wall into a panorama in Kansas City’s Power & Light District. This mural, which depicts aspects of Kansas City Jazz history is located on the south sides of the buildings between Main and Walnut which run North/ South, and Truman road and 14th street which run East/ West. If you scroll and look East, you can see an additional mural (Satchel Paige) on the Two Light Building. If you scroll and look West, you can see the iconic Power and Light Building, from which the district gets its name.

Below is a 360 “tour” of this mural… clicking on the arrows allows you to move left and right.

And here is a link to a Google Tour of the Mural with “Points of Interest” that links to more information about the Mural and KC! Click on the photo to take you to the tour… or just click the link below!

Click on the Photo to access Google Tour
Clcik on photo or this link to access Google Tour https://poly.google.com/view/dC6bwWQqpxD